The Ungodly Surveillance of Anti-Porn ‘Shameware’ Apps!

The Ungodly Surveillance of Anti-Porn ‘Shameware’ Apps

Brit, a former Accountable2You user who requested to only be named by her first name owing to privacy concerns, says “It’s truly not about pornography.” It aims to force you to comply with your pastor’s wishes. Brit claims that her mother and her pastor served as her assigned accountability partners and that she was asked to install the app by her parents after she was discovered viewing pornography.

After reading an article about atheism on Wikipedia, she recalls having to sit down and talk to her pastor. “Just because I was a child doesn’t mean I don’t have a right to read whatever I want to read.”

Even though most accountability apps target parents and families, some also promote their offerings to churches. For instance, Accountable2You promotes group prices for churches or small groups and has created a number of landing pages for particular churches where members can sign up. While this is going on, Covenant Eyes has a director of Church and Ministry Outreach to assist with onboarding religious organizations.

The Ungodly Surveillance of Anti-Porn ‘Shameware’ Apps

Also: Jerry Harris Of Cheer Receives A 12-Year Prison Term Following A Pornography Case!

Accountable2 Your inquiries for comment from WIRED went unanswered.

Co-founder of the Coalition Against Stalkerware and director of cybersecurity at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a charitable organization that promotes digital liberties, is Eva Galperin. Galperin claims that the issue of permission for such surveillance is crucial. According to her, the ability to refuse is one of the essential components of consent.

“You may argue that installing an app in a church environment is done so under coercion.” Although WIRED did not speak to any individuals who were not aware that the app was installed on their phone, as is frequently the case with spyware, Hao-Wei Lin claims he did not feel in a position to refuse his church leader’s request to install Covenant Eyes.

He had an apartment in Berkeley, where he was attending college, for $400 a month thanks to Gracepoint. He might not have had a place to live without the assistance of the church.

But not everyone we spoke to had this experience. James Nagy, a former member of Gracepoint Church and a former congregation leader, has experience on both sides of the Covenant Eyes investigations. Nagy, who is gay, learned early on that homosexuality was wrong.

So he leaped at the chance when Gracepoint gave him a software solution that purported to be able to help what he then perceived to be a moral quandary. He claims that although he thought many Gracepoint employees were under pressure to download the app, in his instance, the push came from within.

Nagy claims that Gracepoint “didn’t try to transform me.” I made an effort to change. Prior to 2021, Nagy worked as a facilitator for the Reformation Project, a nonprofit organization whose goal is to encourage LGBTQ inclusivity in the church. Nagy is currently an elder in the Presbyterian Church (USA).

These accountability applications will gather and preserve incredibly sensitive personal information from its users, including those under the age of 18, in an effort to stop behavior that churches find unethical. Users of the software Fortify, which bills itself as an addiction treatment tool, are prompted to record details about the last time they masturbated, including where they were and the type of device they were using.

Although Fortify’s privacy policy claims that the company does not sell or otherwise share this data with third parties, it does permit sharing of data for the purpose of statistical analysis with “trusted third parties,” but it does not identify these third parties. These trustworthy third parties, according to Clay Olsen, CEO of Fortify’s parent firm Impact Suite, in a phone conversation, include businesses like Mixpanel, an analytics service provider that monitors user interactions with online and mobile applications.

Kimberly

Kimberly is a freelance writer with a love of writing and traveling. She has been writing for most of her life and has been published in various magazines and online publications. She writes about entertainment, technology, and lifestyle-related topics at Gadgetgrapevine.com. Kimberly is always looking for new writing opportunities and loves learning about new cultures and experiences.

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